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Holckner Family Bnei Mitzvah Program

Event details
Date Time
06 Dec 2023 5:00 pm
End Time
06 Dec 2023 6:30 pm
Cost
$10 General Admission
Format
Calendar of Events for 2023, In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

The Melbourne Holocaust Museum’s Holckner Family Bnei Mitzvah program is a ninety-minutes workshop designed to connect those undergoing their Bnei Mitzvah to the Holocaust in a meaningful way. The program will allow participants to engage with the experiences of Holocaust survivors, to be inspired by their resilience and the kindness of strangers, as well as to reflect on the significance of their Bnei Mitzvah and what being Jewish means to them.

Parents/guardians do not need to stay for the duration of the program.

Rosenkranz Oration

Event details
Date Time
09 Nov 2023 7:00 pm
End Time
09 Nov 2023 8:30 pm
Type
Oration
Cost
$10 General Admission | $5 concession
Format
Calendar of Events for 2023, In-Person, Online Livestream, Past events
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

To watch this event online please click here

Please join us for our 2023 oration: Combating hate speech in the digital age.

This year we are pleased to announce our Betty & Shmuel Rosenkranz Oration will be presented by Karel Fracapane – Leader of hate speech issues within the Division for Peace and Sustainable Development arm within the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

Karel has dedicated his professional life to combatting antisemitism and racism, Holocaust remembrance and the prevention of genocide, and violent extremism. Currently, he is focused on global citizenship issues, including hate speech, post-Holocaust issues and addressing contemporary forms of antisemitism.

Please register in advance and secure a place.

Betty & Shmuel Rosenkranz Oration 2023

Event details
About this event

Join us at the Melbourne Holocaust Museum for our annual Betty & Shmuel Rosenkranz Oration. 

This year we are pleased to announce our oration will be presented by Karel Fracapane – Leader of hate speech issues within the Division for Peace and Sustainable Development arm within the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

On 9 November, Karel will address the topic ‘Combatting Hate Speech in the Digital Age.’

Speaker
Karel Fracapane

Karel has dedicated his professional life to combatting antisemitism and racism, to Holocaust remembrance and the prevention of genocide, and violent extremism.

In 2018 Karel pioneered a program aimed at combatting antisemitism worldwide. This program, in partnership with European human rights bodies, saw Karel and his team create a suite of capacity-building activities and resources for educational authorities globally.

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How to Talk About the Holocaust with Children

Event details
Date Time
30 Oct 2023 7:30 pm
End Time
30 Oct 2023 9:00 pm
Type
Panel Discussion
Cost
$20 General Admission | $10 concession
Format
Calendar of Events for 2023, In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

Melbourne Holocaust Museum is excited to host a panel discussion: How to Talk About the Holocaust with Children.

We welcome acclaimed author Morris Gleitzman, Dr Shalya Hirschson a child psychologist and MHM Pedagogy Specialist Lisa Phillips, for an informative conversation moderated by MHM Manager of Adult Education Dr Simon Holloway.

Studying the Holocaust in the 21st Century

Event details
Date Time
23 Oct 2023 7:00 pm
End Time
23 Oct 2023 8:30 pm
Type
Panel Discussion
Cost
$20 General Admission | $10 concession
Format
Calendar of Events for 2023, In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

The Melbourne Holocaust Museum invites you to join us for a panel discussion about studying the Holocaust at a tertiary level.

Perhaps the most studied subject in the humanities today, the Holocaust continues to attract students all over the world. What is it about this subject that inspires so many young researchers and what are the different destinations to which their studies take them? In this panel discussion, chaired by David Slucki from Monash University, we will encounter the research of four different university students and graduates. In addition to exploring their respective motivations, this is also an opportunity to find out what their experiences studying the Holocaust have been like, and any important discoveries that they made along the way.

‘Ngapa William Cooper’ – 7.30 pm

Event details
Date Time
17 Oct 2023 7:30 pm
End Time
17 Oct 2023 8:30 pm
Type
Performance
Cost
General Admission $180
Format
Calendar of Events for 2023, In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

Please join us at Melbourne Holocaust Museum for an exclusive performance featuring Lior & Dr Lou Bennet AM (vocals), The Australian String Quartet, and Andrea Lam (piano).

This event is for the FutureGen community. FutureGen is a new generation of Jewish community members committed to the preservation of Holocaust history and Holocaust education

‘Ngapa William Cooper’ was inspired by the actions of First Nations activist William Cooper in response the persecution of Jews by the Nazi regime on Kristallnacht.

‘Ngapa William Cooper’ is a collaborative creation by renowned composer Nigel Westlake, Lior and Lou Bennett, honouring Cooper’s courage when most were silent.

We are extremely proud to host superb Australian artists at the museum, honouring Indigenous and Jewish lives, in harmony as it should be.

Part of the proceeds from this event will be donated to Magen David Adom in support of Israel.

This event is supported by The Humanity Foundation.

‘Ngapa William Cooper’ – 5.00 pm

Event details
Date Time
17 Oct 2023 5:00 pm
Type
Performance
Cost
General Admission $120 | MHM volunteer $80
Format
Calendar of Events for 2023, In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

Please join us at Melbourne Holocaust Museum for an exclusive performance featuring Lior & Dr Lou Bennet AM (vocals), The Australian String Quartet, and Andrea Lam (piano).

This event is for our volunteers and senior community.

‘Ngapa William Cooper’ was inspired by the actions of First Nations activist William Cooper in response the persecution of Jews by the Nazi regime on Kristallnacht.

‘Ngapa William Cooper’ is a collaborative creation by renowned composer Nigel Westlake, Lior and Lou Bennett, honouring Cooper’s courage when most were silent.

We are extremely proud to host superb Australian artists at the museum, honouring Indigenous and Jewish lives, in harmony as it should be.

Part of the proceeds will be donated to Magen David Adom in support of Israel.

This event is supported by The Humanity Foundation.

Holocaust Education Course October 2023

Event details
Date Time
12 Oct 2023 7:00 pm
End Time
12 Oct 2023 9:00 pm
Type
Education Course
Cost
$360 or $270 for MHM Volunteers/Concession/Teacher
Format
Calendar of Events for 2023, In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum
About this event

Please join us for our nine-week Holocaust Education Course.

This course, running over a series of consecutive weeks, spans the history of the Holocaust from the 19th century through to the liberation of the camps and return to life. Each evening will run from 7-9pm with coffee and tea provided.

The course will be facilitated by MHM Manager of Adult Education Dr Simon Holloway and Co-President Sue Hampel OAM, with each evening dedicated to a particular theme.

Dates and topics are as follows:

Week 1: The World that Was (Thursday, 12 October)

Week 2: From the Cross to the Swastika (Thursday, 19 October)

Week 3: The Rise and Fall of German and Austrian Jewry (Thursday, 26 October)

Week 4: The Concentration Camp Universe (Thursday, 2 November)

Week 5: No session (Rosenkranz Oration at MHM)

Week 6: Death and Life in the Nazi Ghettos ( Thursday, 16 November)

Week 7: Life Unworthy of Life: The Origins of the Final Solution (Thursday, 23 November)

Week 8: By Any Means Available: Jewish Resistance (Thursday, 30 November)

Week 9: A Survey of Non-Jewish Responses to the Holocaust ( Tuesday, 5 December)

Week 9: Liberation and Return to Life (Thursday, 7 December)

If you have any further questions about the course, please contact simon.holloway@mhm.org.au for further information.

Please register in advance and secure a place.

Image | Prisoners head south on a Death March from Dachau concentration camp; Gruenwald, Germany, 29 April, 1945. Courtesy of Yad Vashem.


Survival and Sanctuary

Event details
About this event

Please join Freda Hodge and acclaimed scholar Professor Emeritus Paul Bartrop for the book launch of Survival and Sanctuary: Testimonies of the Holocaust and Life Beyond, at the Melbourne Holocaust Museum (MHM).

Translated into English for the first time, Survival and Sanctuary provides a window into the experiences of survivors through seven testimonies. The book is an exploration of the tension between hope and despair in the aftermath of war, and ultimately a demonstration of the power of the human will.

Come along to this event, to hear about the process of creating this detailed account from from translator Freda Hodge and launcher Paul Bartrop.

Published by Monash University Publishing Survival and Sanctuary will be available for purchase at the event.

Book launch: Survival and Sanctuary

Event details
Date Time
05 Oct 2023 7:00 pm
Type
Book launch
Cost
$10 commitment fee | $5 concession
Format
Calendar of Events for 2023, In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration

Bialystok Commemoration 2023

Event details
About this event

Please join us at Melbourne Holocaust Museum to our Bialystok Holocaust Commemoration, to mark the Uprising and liquidation of the Bialystok ghetto.

All community members, survivors, those of second, third or fourth generation, and friends of survivors are invited to share in commemorating those whose lives, community and homes were lost, those who lost loved ones and family, the city of Bialystok destroyed, the bravery and courage of our uprising. We want to also join in acknowledging all survivors who lived through the blackest days, and the cuturally rich tapestry of the Jewish Community who lived in and around Bialystok.

At this special commemoration we will hear testimony from Bialystok child survivor Helen Granek, who as a child of 9 years was interred in the Bialystok ghetto at the time of the uprising.

For more information please contact Sefra Burstin on 0419521005.

“Displaced” Film Screening

Event details
About this event

Please join the Melbourne Holocaust Museum, in collaboration with the Goethe-Institut, for a special film-screening event.

Displaced is a devastatingly honest 90-minute film which explores the complexity of Jewish life in Germany today. The film’s director, Sharon Ryba-Kahn, is a German-born granddaughter of a Holocaust survivor. Her father, who was always emotionally distant, reconnected with her suddenly after a seven-year silence. Their conversation became the impetus for Sharon to confront her past: to explore her relationship with an absent father, to investigate the nature of her own inherited trauma and to probe beneath the surface of her German friendships. The result of Sharon’s investigation is Displaced.

Following the screening, MHM Manager of Adult Education Dr Simon Holloway will speak with Sharon about the film and take questions from the audience.

This event is held in collaboration with the Goethe-Institut.

Our partners
This event was made possible by:
  • Goethe-Institut

Getting Away with Murder(s)

Event details
Date Time
31 Aug 2023 7:00 pm
Type
Panel discussion
Cost
$10 commitment fee, $5 concession
Format
Calendar of Events for 2023, Online Livestream
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

Please join us online for an exclusive panel discussion hosted by Dr Simon Holloway, featuring the director of Getting Away with Murder(s), David Wilkinson.

Although many spoke of justice in the aftermath of the Holocaust, the overwhelming majority of perpetrators never saw the inside of a courtroom. Some of those who stood trial were acquitted, while many of those who were found guilty only served brief sentences, ending their lives in comfort and relative obscurity. While a few committed individuals endeavoured to seek out and prosecute former war criminals, a growing popular indifference made the exacting of justice increasingly difficult.

In this live webinar, Simon will engage in discussion with David Wilkinson, whose new film – Getting Away with Murder(s) – explores the desperate attempts made by individuals and organisations to bring perpetrators of genocide to justice, and the ways in which the justice system ultimately failed. Joining us in conversation will be Professor Mary Fulbrook, whose recent book Reckonings explores the complex history of postwar justice, and Philip Rubenstein: former director of the UK’s All-Party Parliamentary War Crimes Group.

Getting Away with Murder(s) is available in Australia on 7Plus. It contains some graphic footage.

Lodz Commemoration 2023

Event details
About this event

Join the Melbourne Holocaust Museum and the Lodz Committee in commemoration of the 79th anniversary of the liquidation of the Lodz Ghetto.

The Landsmanshaftn were societies of Jewish immigrants who came from the same town or region in Eastern Europe. They were named for the members’ original birthplaces. They were formed to assist their fellow ‘townspeople’ in settling into their new lives in Australia. This assistance – material, emotional, cultural, and social – helped many new arrivals to begin their acclimatisation to life in their new country.

By 1949, numerous attempts had been made to form a Lodzer Landsmanshaft. In 1953 an initiating committee was formed with the aim of calling a general meeting of Melbourne Jews from the Polish city of Lodz and organising an evening to commemorate the memory of their annihilated community.

Today’s Lodz Committee consists of second and third generation descendants. As the years pass by and we have fewer of our precious survivors with us, we realise the importance of involving the younger generations in helping us remember the Lodzers who called Melbourne their home. Today we remember and honour Jewish Lodz, and its inhabitants, the last embers of a once glorious and vibrant community.

This year’s program includes honouring six of our Lodz Ghetto survivors with a special candle lighting ceremony; recounts of Lodz family artefacts by Mary, David and Lee Slade and Dr Eli Kotler; music by Elliot Freeman.

Justice and Judgement After the Holocaust

Event details
About this event

Join MHM Co-President Sue Hampel OAM for a lecture on The Nuremberg Trials. 

The Nuremberg Trials set an important precedent in international law, while the Eichmann trial brought Nazi atrocities to a global audience and put Holocaust survivors at centre stage.

A number of the defendants were executed, others faced prison sentences of varying lengths, and some perpetrators were acquitted.

Was justice served at Nuremberg and Jerusalem? Is justice ever possible? This lecture will explore the significance of these two trials in the light of these questions and will examine the very nature of justice and judgement after the Holocaust.

Image | View of the defendants in the dock at the International Military Tribunal trial of war criminals at Nuremberg. Courtesy of USHMM and the National Archives and Records Administration.

“The Words are Ascending”: Theological Responses to the Holocaust

Event details
About this event

The Melbourne Holocaust Museum invites you to a theological lecture presented by Dr Simon Holloway (manager of adult education) exploring the question:

“Where was God in the Holocaust?”

Although this may be a question without an answer, it represents a serious theological problem.

If God is truly all-powerful, as Jewish theology claims, for what reason did the Holocaust occur? This session will make no attempt at answering this question, but it will seek provide a framework for understanding the answers that some people have given.

By considering Jewish responses to suffering throughout history, we will demonstrate the ways in which the Holocaust was unprecedented, and the reasons that traditional theological models do not fit. We will then consider the variety of ways in which Jewish people have responded to the problems of the Holocaust – both during the Holocaust itself, and over the decades since.

Book your tickets for this thought-provoking evening, below.

Painting by Samuel Bak, “Burning”. Oil on canvas, 1995. Courtesy of Israel Museum, Jerusalem

Hear a Witness: Sarah Saaroni OAM

Event details
About this event

Join us at the Melbourne Holocaust Museum for the rare opportunity to hear first-hand from  Holocaust survivor Sarah Saaroni OAM. 

Sarah was born in Lublin, Poland in 1926. Soon after the German invasion her family moved into the Lublin Ghetto. When deportations began Sarah and her family went into hiding in a nearby village.

Her parents told her to pretend to be Christian and go with other Poles to work in Germany.

For the next few years Sarah lived under false identities as a Christian labourer. She escaped capture several times. At the end of the war Sarah returned to Lublin but found no family there. She eventually reunited with one brother.

Sarah met her husband in Palestine in 1946. They married in 1948, where another brother had lived since before the war. Sarah arrived in Australia in 1953.

Join us at the Melbourne Holocaust Museum on 6 August to meet Sarah and learn about her experiences.

Different Voices: Women and the Holocaust

Event details
About this event

Join MHM Co-President Sue Hampel as she applies gender as a lens for looking at the Holocaust in this stimulating lecture. 

Different Voices: Women and the Holocaust will consider the ‘”female voice” to shed light on Jewish women’s experiences during the Holocaust by discussing three case studies:

The reaction and responses of Jewish women living in Nazi Germany
The coping strategies women employed in the ghettos and concentration camps
The heroism of female resistors

By examining diaries, documents and testimonies, Sue will assess the “double jeopardy” that Jewish women faced on a daily basis during the Holocaust.

Photo of Jewish women prisoners in front of the barracks. Courtesy of Yad Vashem.