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Kraków Ghetto Commemoration 2024

Event details
Date Time
09 Jun 2024 12:00 pm
End Time
09 Jun 2024 1:30 pm
Type
Commemoration
Cost
Free
Format
Commemoration, In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

Join the Cracow Memorial Committee for the 81st anniversary commemoration of the liquidation of the Kraków ghetto.

Commemorate the tragic events of March 13th and 14th, 1943, when the Kraków ghetto was liquidated.

Honor the memory of the pre-war Jewish community that perished during the Holocaust.

Celebrate the resilience of life over death—the victory of survival and remembrance.

This solemn event serves as a bridge between generations now living in Melbourne, ensuring that the memory of those lost remains alive and that the lessons of history continue to resonate.

Hope is a Verb – Ben M Freeman

Event details
Date Time
06 Jun 2024 7:30 pm
End Time
06 Jun 2024 9:00 pm
Type
Q & A
Cost
$180 Meet and Greet | $45 General admission | $35 Concession/MHM volunteer
Format
In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

Please join us for a Q & A with acclaimed UK author and educator Ben M Freeman and MHM Manager of Adult Education, Dr Simon Holloway.


What does it mean to be proud of being Jewish? In a post-October 7th world, when so many aspects of Jewish identity are being put under a microscope, some might feel more comfortable keeping their cultural and religious observance private.

 

In this timely and important conversation, Ben M. Freeman will discuss the importance of being open about one’s Jewishness, the necessity of maintaining Jewish pride, and techniques for inculcating a love of Judaism in one’s children. With increasing levels of antisemitism in Melbourne and around the world, this conversation will also afford an opportunity to consider tactics for navigating hostile situations.

Holckner Family Bnei Mitzvah Program

Event details
Date Time
30 May 2024 5:00 pm
End Time
30 May 2024 6:30 pm
Cost
$10 General Admission
Format
In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

The Melbourne Holocaust Museum’s Holckner Family Bnei Mitzvah program is a ninety-minutes workshop designed to connect those undergoing their Bnei Mitzvah to the Holocaust in a meaningful way. The program will allow participants to engage with the experiences of Holocaust survivors, to be inspired by their resilience and the kindness of strangers, as well as to reflect on the significance of their Bnei Mitzvah and what being Jewish means to them.

Parents/guardians do not need to stay for the duration of the program.

Exploring Contemporary Antisemitism Through a Historical Lens

Event details
Date Time
23 May 2024 7:30 pm
End Time
23 May 2024 9:00 pm
Type
Lecture
Cost
$20 General Admission | $10 concession
Format
In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

The Melbourne Holocaust Museum invites you to a lecture run by Prof. Andrew Markus AO FASSA.

Rabbi Ralph Genende wrote in early March that “since October 7, I have keenly realised that history has apparently reverted back to the most primeval of times… I certainly never expected to feel this way in Australia.” The Executive Council of Australian Jewry documented 662 antisemitic incidents during October and November 2023, reflecting a 738% increase compared to the same period the previous year. Among these incidents were death threats directed at Jewish organisations and individuals, frequent anti-Israel demonstrations extolling violence, pervasive acts of intimidation such as the public release of personal information identifying members of a Jewish Australian WhatsApp group, and the proliferation of toxic content on social media platforms. Notable flashpoints included a convoy of vehicles driven from Sydney’s western suburbs through the centre of Jewish community and a violent street protest in Caulfield, prompting the evacuation of a synagogue. This talk will consider historical contexts to evaluate present-day manifestations of antisemitism, with reference to earlier periods of Australian history and pre-war Europe.

Image | Shutterstock

Speaker
Prof. Andrew Markus AO FASSA.

Andrew Markus is Emeritus Professor in Monash University’s Faculty of Arts and was previously Director of the university’s Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation.  Since 2004 he has been a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia. He was appointed an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2021. He is the author or co-author of more than one hundred academic articles, book chapters, reference works, and reports, and of nineteen books, including Australian Race Relations, The Struggle for Aboriginal Rights, and A Second Chance: A History of Yiddish Melbourne.

He has played a leading role in two national surveys of the Jewish community, Gen08 and Gen17, and was the senior researcher on the Scanlon Foundation social cohesion surveys from 2007 to 2021.

The 11th Hour: The Holocaust in Hungary

Event details
Date Time
16 May 2024 7:00 pm
End Time
16 May 2024 8:30 pm
Type
Lecture
Cost
$20 General Admission | $10 concession
Format
In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

On 16 May, MHM Manager of Adult Education Dr Simon Holloway will present a lecture in collabration with B’nai B’rith, exploring the Holocaust experience for Jewish communities living in Hungary.

In 1944, the Jewish communities of Hungary made up some of the last remaining Jews in all of Axis-controlled Europe. The tragic story of their annihilation is all the more macabre when one considers that it happened under the gaze of the entire world, who knew what deportation meant. In this lecture, coinciding with the 80th anniversary of the deportations from Hungary, we will explore the peculiar situation faced by Hungarian Jews in light of their prewar experiences, the means by which they were so rapidly destroyed, and some of the heroic attempts made at the 11th hour to rescue them.

Image | A memorial to the murdered Jews in Hungary, on the Danube river, Hungary.

 

 

 

Speaker
Dr Simon Holloway

PhD, Classical Hebrew and Biblical Studies: MA; Ancient History

Simon has a passion for Holocaust education and believes strongly in helping to preserve the legacy of our survivors. In his role he creates and oversees programs to enhance broader community understanding of the Holocaust and its lessons.

For six years, Simon served as a sessional lecturer at the University of Sydney, and as an Education Officer at the Sydney Jewish Museum. Simon has developed and taught programs relating to Nazi racial science, Jewish resistance and the history of the Holocaust. Simon’s research interests concern the identification of references to the biblical and rabbinic literature in documents produced during the war.

Hear a Witness: Guta Goldstein

Event details
Date Time
12 May 2024 11:00 am
End Time
12 May 2024 12:00 pm
Type
Survivor talk
Cost
$20 General Admission | $15 concession
Format
In-Person, Survivor Talk
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

Join us at the Melbourne Holocaust Museum for the rare opportunity to hear first-hand from Holocaust survivor Guta Goldstein. 

Guta was born in Lodz, Poland in 1930. She was nine years old when the Germans invaded Poland.

Guta, her sister, and father were forced into the Lodz Ghetto. Both her sister and father died of illness.

on 14 August 1944 Guta was transported to Auschwitz, where her aunt and cousin were sent to the gas chambers on arrival.

In September Guta and her remaining cousins were transferred to Bergen-Belsen concentration camp.

Guta was eventually sent to the labour camp of Mehltheuer and was liberated by the US army in April 1945.

Guta arrived to Australia in 1949.

Inheriting Memories and Preserving Truth

Event details
Date Time
06 May 2024 7:30 pm
End Time
06 May 2024 9:00 pm
Type
Commemoration
Cost
$10 commitment fee
Format
Commemoration, In-Person, Online Livestream
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

We invite you to join us for the commemoration of Yom HaShoah on Monday 6 May 2024.

This year we will host a panel discussion moderated by MHM CEO Dr Steven Cooke. We look forward to hearing from our three panellists, Rachelle Unreich, Anita Lester and Adam Butt, who will share their lived and professional experience of taking on the custodianship of memory.  The evening will explore how we can all carry the lessons of the Holocaust into the future and will seek to understand how, in a world threatened by increasing misinformation, distortion and denial, we can bring truth to the forefront.

Image | Simon Shiff

Holocaust Education Course 2024

Event details
Date Time
01 May 2024 7:00 pm
End Time
26 Jun 2024 9:00 pm
Type
Education Course
Cost
$360 or $270 for MHM Volunteers/Concession/Teacher
Format
In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum
About this event

Please join us for our nine-week Holocaust Education Course.

This course, running over a series of consecutive weeks, spans the history of the Holocaust from the 19th century through to the liberation of the camps and return to life. Each evening will run from 7-9pm with coffee and tea provided.

The course will be facilitated by MHM Manager of Adult Education Dr Simon Holloway, Co-President Sue Hampel OAM with each evening dedicated to a particular theme.

If you have any further questions about the course, please contact simon.holloway@mhm.org.au for further information.

Please register in advance and secure a place.

Image | Prisoners head south on a Death March from Dachau concentration camp; Gruenwald, Germany, 29 April, 1945. Courtesy of Yad Vashem.

Dates and topics are as follows:

Week 1: The World that Was (Wednesday, 1 May)

Week 2: From the Cross to the Swastika (Wednesday, 8 May)

Week 3: The Rise and Fall of German Jewry and Austrian Jewry  (Wednesday, 15 May)

Week 4: Death and Life in the Nazi Ghettos (Wednesday, 22 May)

Week 5: Life Unworthy of Life: The Origins of the Final Solution (Wednesday, 29 May)

Week 6: The Concentration Camp Universe (Wednesday, 5 June)

Break – no course on the week of 12 June.

Week 7: By Any Means Available: Jewish Resistance (Wednesday, 19 June)

Week 8: Survey of Non-Jewish Responses (Wednesday, 24 June)

Week 9: Liberation and Return to Life (Wednesday 26, June)

 

 

FutureGen launch event

Event details
Date Time
18 Apr 2024 7:15 pm
End Time
18 Apr 2024 9:00 pm
Type
Launch
Cost
$48 General Admission
Format
In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

The Melbourne Holocaust Museum invites you to the exciting launch of FutureGen.
A new generation committed to the preservation of Holocaust history and education

This event will feature guest speaker Holocaust survivor Peter Gaspar OAM. There will also be a special opportunity to tour the ‘Everybody Had a Name’ exhibition and to experience the memorial room after dark.

Cocktails and canapés will be served.

This event is for the FutureGen community. FutureGen is a new generation of community members committed to the preservation of Holocaust history and Holocaust education

Preserving Truth in the Digital Age

Event details
Date Time
11 Apr 2024 7:30 pm
End Time
11 Apr 2024 9:30 pm
Type
Lecture
Cost
$20 General Admission | $10 concession
Format
In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

How can we ensure the preservation of Holocaust memory in the age of technology and artificial intelligence (AI)?

Presented by Dr Victoria Grace Walden SFHEA FRSA MILM.

The rise and use of AI and new technologies in our society brings with it advantages as well as new challenges to Holocaust museums.

Although AI and technology present many dangers to the preservation of truth, if used correctly, they can make a vital contribution to the sustainability of Holocaust memory, providing the tools to preserve and share historical collections in ways that weren’t possible before.

Join us as Dr Victoria Walden addresses the value and the limitations of technology during this transformational phase of Holocaust education.

Speaker
Dr Victoria Grace Walden SFHEA FRSA MILM

Dr Victoria Grace Walden SFHEA FRSA MILM is the Director of Learning Enhancement and Senior Lecturer in Media at the School of Media, Arts and Humanities, Sussex Weidenfeld Institute of Jewish Studies. She is the author of Digital Holocaust Memory, Education and Research (2021).

Film screening – Dreyfus Drei

Event details
Date Time
07 Apr 2024 1:00 pm
End Time
07 Apr 2024 2:30 pm
Type
Film screening
Cost
General Admission $25 | $15 Concession/MHM volunteer
Format
Film Screening, In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

Please join the Melbourne Holocaust Museum, in collaboration with the Goethe-Institut, for a special film-screening event.

When Sydney-based artist and academic Ella Dreyfus set about exploring her late father’s experiences in the Holocaust, she began a journey that would take her back to Berlin and would culminate with the completion of a powerful 30-minute documentary. With the hope that her film will initiate a dialogue for subsequent generations to confront their own inherited traumas, Dreyfus Drei seeks to penetrate the wall of silence that many survivors erect around their lives.

Combining family interviews in Melbourne and Sydney with visits to the family’s former homes and the construction of public art installations in Germany, the film also features her uncle George Dreyfus’s musical compositions and her cousin Jonathan’s new arrangements. Dreyfus Drei creates a family portrait about exile, identity, and art, and navigates the complex terrain of how three generations from one family each negotiate their own return to the “homeland”.

Dreyfus Drei was written, directed and produced by Ella Dreyfus, co-directed and co-produced by Janis Westphal, Sevenpeaks Films in Berlin, executive production by the Goethe-Institut and commissioned by the German Federal Government Commissioner for Culture and the Media for the 1700 Years of Jewish Life in Germany Festival.

After the screening of Dreyfus Drei, Dr Simon Holloway will be in conversation with the director, Ella Dreyfus, who will also take questions from the audience. Following this conversation, participants will have the opportunity to explore our new museum exhibit: Everybody Had a Name.

Learn more about Dreyfus Drei at www.dreyfus3.com

Image | Dreyfus Drei film cover

'Dreyfus Drei' trailer

Hear a Witness: Vivienne Spiegel

Event details
Date Time
07 Apr 2024 11:00 am
End Time
07 Apr 2024 12:00 pm
Type
Survivor talk
Cost
$20 General Admission | $15 concession
Format
In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

Join us at the Melbourne Holocaust Museum for the rare opportunity to hear first-hand from Holocaust survivor Vivienne Spiegel.

Viv was born in Paris, France in 1934. She was six years old when the Germans invaded France.

In July 1942 Viv’s, her mother, and two siblings were caught up in the Vel d’Hiv Round Up. In a stroke of luck, the family was released before the transports to Auschwitz.

Following this, Viv’s mother made the difficult decision to separate from her children for their safety. After experiences with families that stole their food rations, Viv and her siblings were sent into hiding in the countryside with a family who cared for them until the end of the war.

After liberation, Viv and her siblings were sent to an orphanage for children, before immigrating to Australia in 1948.

Viv later found out her parents were murdered in Auschwitz-Birkenau.

The Power of Social Sculpture: Stih and Schnock in Conversation with Prof Andrea Witcomb

Event details
Date Time
10 Mar 2024 2:30 pm
End Time
10 Mar 2024 4:00 pm
Type
Panel Discussion
Cost
$20 General Admission | $10 concession
Format
In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

The Melbourne Holocaust Museum is proud to host German artists Renata Stih and Frieder Schnock, whose projects over the past three decades, across Europe and the United States, have explored ideas related to collective memory and the Holocaust.

We invite you to hear Professors Stih and Schnock in conversation about the power of public art as a form of social intervention, and their recent commission, Evidence of Evil, displayed within the museum’s new permanent exhibition. This conversation will be moderated by Prof Andrea Witcomb.

 

Stih and Schnock’s sculpture Bus Stop will be on display at the Museum through March 2024.

 

This event is supported by

Different Voices: Women and the Holocaust – 4 week course

Event details
Date Time
07 Mar 2024 7:00 pm
End Time
28 Mar 2024 8:30 pm
Type
Course
Cost
General Admission $120 | Concession/MHM volunteer $80
Format
In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

Please join us for a four-week course 

Different Voices: Women and the Holocaust will apply gender as a lens for understanding the Holocaust. More than 2 million girls and women were murdered during the Holocaust, and their experiences must be understood for their uniqueness. Over the course of 4-weeks we will consider the ‘female voice’ to shed light on Jewish women’s experiences during the Holocaust by examining ghettos, camps, hiding, and resistance. By considering diaries, documents, and testimonies, we will delve into the lived experience that Jewish women faced on a daily basis during the Holocaust and the lessons we can take into the world today.

The course will be facilitated by Head of Exhibitions and Programming Dr Breann Fallon and Co-President Sue Hampel OAM with each evening dedicated to a particular theme.

Launch Event: Stih and Schnock’s Bus Stop

Event details
Date Time
05 Mar 2024 7:30 pm
End Time
05 Mar 2024 9:00 pm
Type
Launch
Cost
$10 commitment fee | $5 concession
Format
In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

Please join us for the launch of Bus Stop, an installation by renowned German artists, Renata Stih and Frieder Schnock.

Originally conceived in 1995 as an alternative to a static Holocaust memorial in Berlin, Bus Stop, a mobile sculpture, enables the public to actively commemorate the Holocaust by engaging with former sites of Nazi atrocity. “We wanted to create a work that enables active remembrance through the networking of places and information.”

Professors Stih and Schnock will discuss Bus Stop’s conception and ongoing significance.

Bus Stop will be on display at the Museum through March 2024. 

 

This event is supported by

“BUS STOP” was Stih and Schnock’s response to the competition for a “Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe”, where a representative memorial was planned in the center of Berlin, near Brandenburg Gate. Their concept of a transitory memorial aims to clarify that doesn’t need monumental constructs to commemorate the victims, because the whole country and many parts of Europe are full of places and stories that need to be preserved from oblivion. Visiting the former concentration camps makes you feel a sense of trepidation, because the idea of horrific events, the view of harrowing documents that we know from film footage and photos remains unforgettable. Stih and Schnock conceptualized an installation of a transitory sculpture on the dedicated lot, a bus terminal. From there, red buses would drive to actual commemoration sites and former death camps in both, near and distant vicinity all over Europe. The destination and the inscription “Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe” is written on the red buses. In this way the remembrance of the Holocaust is redirected to the crime scenes, away from that lofty site in the middle of the German capital and right into the banal everyday structure of our mobile society.

 

Hear a Witness: Joe Szwarcberg

Event details
Date Time
03 Mar 2024 11:00 am
End Time
03 Mar 2024 12:00 pm
Type
Survivor talk
Cost
Free
Format
In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

Join us at the Melbourne Holocaust Museum for the rare opportunity to hear first-hand from Holocaust survivor Joe Szwarcberg. 

Joe was born in 1930 in Kozienice, Poland, the youngest of six children. The Germans invaded in 1939 when Joe was nine years old and incarcerated the Jewish population in a ghetto.

Joe risked his life by leaving the ghetto to get food, but nonetheless his mother died due to the poor conditions there. He was deported to a harsh labour camp where he witnessed the murder of one of his brothers. In 1944 he was sent to the Buchenwald concentration camp.

After his liberation in 1945 at the age of 15 Joe was reunited with his sisters. His father had died in a death march from Auschwitz and neither of his brothers survived.

In the Midst of Civilized Europe: The Pogroms of 1918-1921 in Ukraine and the Onset of the Holocaust

Event details
Date Time
27 Feb 2024 7:00 pm
End Time
27 Feb 2024 8:30 pm
Type
Panel Discussion
Cost
$20 General Admission | $10 concession
Format
In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum, Elsternwick - address provided on registration
About this event

The Melbourne Holocaust Museum and ACJC invite you to a panel discussion about the Pogroms of 1918-1921 in Ukraine and the Onset of the Holocaust.

Between 1918 and 1921, over a hundred thousand Jews were murdered in Ukraine by peasants, townsmen and soldiers who blamed the Jews for the turmoil of the Russian Revolution. Largely forgotten today, these pogroms served as precursors to the Holocaust. Through stories of survivors, perpetrators, aid workers and governmental officials, Professor Veidlinger explains how so many different groups came to the same conclusion – killing Jews was an acceptable response to their problems.

 

Image | Jewish men survey damage done to Torah scrolls during pogroms in Russia, Getty Images

Speaker
Prof Jeffrey Veidlinger

Jeffrey Veidlinger is Joseph Brodsky Collegiate Professor of History and Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan. His most recent book, In the Midst of Civilized Europe: The Ukrainian Pogroms of 1918-1921 and the Onset of the Holocaust (2021) won a Canadian Jewish Literary Award and the Stan Vine Book Award and was a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award, the Lionel Gelber Award, and the Wingate Literary Prize. It was named a top book of the year by Kirkus, the Times Literary SupplementMosaic Magazine, El Mundo, and El Espanol. He is also the author of the award-winning books The Moscow State Yiddish Theater: Jewish Culture on the Soviet Stage (2000), Jewish Public Culture in the Late Russian Empire (2009), and In the Shadow of the Shtetl: Small-Town Jewish Life in Soviet Ukraine (2013). Veidlinger is Chair of the Academic Advisory Council of the Center for Jewish History, a member of the Academic Committee of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, and a member of the Executive Committee of the American Academy for Jewish Research.

Holocaust Education Course 2024

Event details
Date Time
30 Jan 2024 2:45 pm
End Time
26 Jun 2024 9:00 pm
Type
Education Course
Cost
$360 or $270 for MHM Volunteers/Concession/Teacher
Format
In-Person
Venue
Melbourne Holocaust Museum
About this event

Please join us for our nine-week Holocaust Education Course.

This course, running over a series of consecutive weeks, spans the history of the Holocaust from the 19th century through to the liberation of the camps and return to life. Each evening will run from 7-9pm with coffee and tea provided.

The course will be facilitated by MHM Manager of Adult Education Dr Simon Holloway, Co-President Sue Hampel OAM and Head of Exhibitions and Programming Dr Breann Fallon with each evening dedicated to a particular theme.

If you have any further questions about the course, please contact simon.holloway@mhm.org.au for further information.

Please register in advance and secure a place.

Image | Prisoners head south on a Death March from Dachau concentration camp; Gruenwald, Germany, 29 April, 1945. Courtesy of Yad Vashem.

Dates and topics are as follows:

Week 1: The World that Was (Wednesday, 1 May)

Week 2: From the Cross to the Swastika (Wednesday, 8 May)

Week 3: The Rise and Fall of German Jewry and Austrian Jewry  (Wednesday, 15 May)

Week 4: Death and Life in the Nazi Ghettos (Wednesday, 22 May)

Week 5: Life Unworthy of Life: The Origins of the Final Solution (Wednesday, 29 May)

Week 6: The Concentration Camp Universe (Wednesday, 5 June)

Break – no course on the week of 12 June.

Week 7: By Any Means Available: Jewish Resistance (Wednesday, 19 June)

Week 8: Survey of Non-Jewish Responses (Wednesday, 24 June)

Week 9: Liberation and Return to Life (Wednesday 26, June)